AMSA
 
Before You Move  
  When to Move  
  Before You Get an Estimate  
  How to Plan Your Move  
  Top Ten Ways to Prepare for a Smooth Move  
  Deducting Moving Expenses from Your Federal Taxes  
  Items that Should Not be Shipped  
  Placing a Value on Your Shipment  
  How to Treat Your Moving Crew  
  Moving Terminology  
  Ask the Expert  
  Moving Internationally? Use a RIM Certified Mover  
International Moving (PDF)  
 
 
 
 
Home :: :: Before You Move :: How to Treat Your Moving Crew
How to Treat Your Moving Crew

We occasionally hear from consumers who have questions about how to best interact with a moving crew at either end of a relocation. To offer some guidance, we have developed the following top to help make sure the van driver and other crew members can perform safely, efficiently and comfortably.

  • Provide the essentials. Consider the crew’s needs and comfort: offer access to drinking water, designate a bathroom for their use, and keep hand sanitizer available. Have disposable paper towels handy, to save your linens and other items from the possibility of moving-related grime. And you might want to identify an outside area where smoking would be permitted.
  • Meet and greet. Take time to meet your crewmembers and make them feel welcome. Always have one responsible adult available throughout the move to answer questions, and make sure they know which room you’re calling a den and which one is a “family room,” etc.
  • Keep kids and pets busy. Make arrangements to keep small children and pets occupied so they don’t get in the way. If possible, have them stay with friends or relatives at the time of the move.
  • It's food for thought. Most crews greatly appreciate coffee in the morning and the offer to pick up a fast lunch, since it's time-consuming to close up the truck and cumbersome to maneuver a tractor-trailer around a typical downtown area.
  • Keep the temperature in check. If moving during very hot or cold weather, consider providing fans or space heaters, as exterior doors will likely be left open.
  • Provide feedback. If you’re pleased with your crew, send a nice letter to the carrier as all drivers are ranked by quality scores and comments by customers.  As with all hardworking front-line customer service professionals, tips, while not expected, are a great way to show your appreciation for a job well done.